Maternal Plasma Homocysteine Level, 24-Hour Urinary Protein and Haemoglobin in Pre-eclamptic Patients: is there Any Relationship?

Authors

  • S Aamir
  • Zamir Ahmad
  • A Shamsi
  • K Sultana
  • Qurat Al Ain
  • M S Bhatti

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v13i2.90

Abstract

Background:  Anemia is very common in developing countries especially during pregnancy. Hyperhomocysteinemia can result from genetic or nutrient-related disturbances in the transsulfuration or remethylation pathway for homocysteine metabolism. Inadequate intake of vitamin B12, B6 or folate may underlie some cases of elevated homocysteine levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between plasma homocysteine level, haemoglobin level and 24-hour urinary protein in pre-eclamptic patients. Folic acid deficiency is one of the major cause of hyperhomocysteinemia which is one of the major risk factor for pre-eclampsia (PET). Severe proteinuria of several grams/day occurs in pre-eclamptic toxaemia.

Methods:  A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out on 90 primigravidae attending the "antenatal clinic" of Services Hospital, Lahore. Out of these 60 primigravidae 30 were mildly pre-eclamptic and 30 were severely pre-eclamptic at 30-38 weeks of pregnancy.30 primigravida [30-38 weeks of pregnancy] having uncomplicated pregnancy were taken as control.

Results:  The results show that in mild PET and in severe PET, the plasma homocysteine level shows a significant relationship with 24-hour urinary protein and hemoglobin level.

Conclusion:  Anemia [folic acid deficiency] is one of the important risk factor in the causation of hyperhomocysteinemia which is one of the major chronic risk factors for eclampsia.

Key-Words:  Hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, mild PET, severe PET.

How to Cite

Aamir, S., Ahmad, Z., Shamsi, A., Sultana, K., Ain, Q. A., & Bhatti, M. S. (1). Maternal Plasma Homocysteine Level, 24-Hour Urinary Protein and Haemoglobin in Pre-eclamptic Patients: is there Any Relationship?. Annals of King Edward Medical University, 13(2). https://doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v13i2.90

Issue

Section

Articles